Chapter 2 – Setting Up Your Camera

How to hold a dSLR correctly

Figure 14. A. Correct landscape orientation hold B. Incorrect landscape orientation hold. C. Best portrait orientation hold D. Alternate portrait orientation hold E. Incorrect portrait orientation hold

 

Examples of problematic shots taken on the green auto setting

Subject backlit on green auto makes silhouette

A. Backlit subject: Place your subject (preferably a person) in front of a bright window and take a photo of them.

Fast subjects are a blur on the green auto setting

B. Fast subject: Have your subject indoors or in the shade and have them move around quickly. If you have room in the space, have them run back and forth. If space is limited, just have them wave their arms up and down. Take photos of them doing these actions.

On green auto it will only focus on closest object in room

C. Subject is not in the foreground: Set up a shot so that your subject (it can be a person or an object) is not the closest thing to the camera. For example, a bird in a cage, or a person standing at the back of the room and a table in the middle of the room.

High noon: Take a shot of someone outside on a sunny day around noon.  Observe the harsh light and unflattering shadows created on your subject’s face.

D. High noon: Take a shot of someone outside on a sunny day around noon. Observe the harsh light and unflattering shadows created on your subject’s face.

Problems with dynamic range in JPG image

E. Light and Dark in one shot: Take a shot on a bright day that includes the bright blue sky and a part of the ground with shadows on it.

night shots on the green auto setting over flash the subject and leave the background too dark

F. Night shot: Take a photo of someone at night time standing in front of a location that doesn’t have very much light.

>> Chapter 3 – Preset Modes

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